This is a poem I wrote when I was, maybe, eleven or twelve, when I first heard of the second law of thermodynamics:


.
 s        a                        r
  d
   r
    a                               n
     w            l      e
      k
       c    t
        a
         b
 m          
            y               l
             l
              e
               v
                a
                 r         o ;
                  b                  l
                    
             e      g
                     n
                      i
                       h
                        c
                         r
                       u  a
                           m
                      I                             
                 u           ,
                               e
                 t              f
                                 i     h
 s           f               u    l
            b                       
         e                          y
                                     l
                      t               n
                                       o

I was reminded of it by reading this from Norbert Wiener:

We are swimming upstream against a great torrent of disorganization, which tends to reduce everything to the heat death of equilibrium and sameness. … This heat death in physics has a counterpart in the ethics of Kierkegaard, who pointed out that we live in a chaotic moral universe. In this, our main obligation is to establish arbitrary enclaves of order and system. … Like the Red Queen, we cannot stay where we are without running as fast as we can (Norbert Wiener, I Am a Mathematician: The Later Life of a Prodigy (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1964), 324; quoted by James Gleick in The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood (New York: Pantheon Books, 2011), 237).